Crochet Stitch Conversion Chart

Crochet Stitches

The need for a Crochet Stitch Conversion Chart is because the U.S. and U.K. basic stitches, even though they are the same stitches, are called different names. There is one set of basic stitches worldwide, but there are two sets of names for them. They are listed in the table below.

If you are reading a pattern and have no idea whether you are reading a U.S. or U.K. pattern then you can find out which country your pattern is from by looking in the front or the back of your pattern book; it will be noted who printed the book, where the book was printed and their contact details. This will give you a fair idea as to which kind of stitches are printed within the book.

You will want to know whether your pattern uses U.S. or U.K. stitches before starting your pattern so that you end up crocheting your project correctly.

Below you will find the crochet stitch conversion chart so that when you are reading a pattern that was made in either the U.S. or U.K. you can convert your stitches to suit your needs.

Note: In Australia, crochet pattern books which are sold here are generally using U.K. stitches. U.S. pattern books are available in Australia also but if you are Australian and don’t know what stitches you’ve been crocheting then it’s highly likely that you’ve been using the U.K. stitches. I’ve come across many of people who crochet and couldn’t tell me whether they were crocheting U.S. or U.K. stitches because they were simply unaware of the fact that stitches are named differently in other countries.

 

Crochet Stitch Conversion Chart

United States (U.S.) United Kingdom (U.K.)
chain = ch chain = ch
single crochet = sc double crochet = dc
half double crochet = hdc half treble crochet = htr
double crochet = dc treble = tr
triple (or treble) crochet = tr or trc double treble = dtr
double treble (or double triple) = dtr or dbltr/c triple treble = ttr
triple treble = ttr quadruple treble = qtr

 

This can be extremely confusing and even more so for a beginner, especially if you weren’t aware of the fact that there are two sets of terms for crochet stitches. I know I scratched my head a fair few times before I figured out what was going on!

Personally, I find that the U.S. stitch terms make more sense because they describe the stitch as what they really are. I’m sure that you will agree once you wrap your head around all of the U.S. and U.K. stitch terms from this crochet stitch conversion chart.

I suggest you print this chart out and have it handy for when you need it.

So, don’t worry, I’m sure that the majority of us crocheters had and still have problems with this. Glad you’ve joined the gang!

All the best,

Paula Daniele

 

365 Crochet Stitches a Year365 Crochet Stitches a Year

Now crocheters can access hundreds of unique stitches in a perpetual-calendar format! With a different crochet stitch for every day of the year, this clever calendar makes a valuable addition to any pattern collection.

Find step-by-step instructions for 365 crochet stitches, from easy to advanced. Each day spotlights a solid-colored swatch in a full-color and a close-up photograph.

A sturdy spiral binding keeps this perpetual calendar in tip-top shape, even through years of turning pages.

 

Crochet Stitch Pattern Books

  1. 300 Crochet Stitches
  2. 108 Crochet Cluster Stitches
  3. The Complete Book of Crochet Stitch Designs, 500 Classic and Original Patterns

 

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About Paula

I'm the Crochet Designer, Teacher & Video Producer of Crochet Hooks You.

I taught myself how to crochet when I was a young girl and quickly picked up how to crochet the granny square and got hooked. Read More.

Comments

  1. Ouff i taught i will come to say that i am impress with ur beautiful art. I do crochet and knitting since i was 18 years old and still enjoy more and more.

    Proud to be a guy and proud to know that kind of Art.

    Take good care of u Paula and thanks for sharing it with us.

    Freindly yours, Jean Claude

    • Paula says:

      Thank you for your comment, Jean Claude, and that’s great you’ve been crocheting since you were 18 yrs old and still going.

      You take care also and it’s nice to be sharing crochet with you.

      All the best,
      Paula Daniele :-)

  2. Rebecca says:

    One really easy way to tell the origins of your patterns is if it has single crochet as one of its stitches. If it does, it’s a US pattern – there is no SC stitch in UK terminology. I have heard other people state that in the UK a slip stitch is referred to as a SC but that’s not true. A slip stitch is a slip stitch here just the same.

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